It’s no secret that at nightclubs and parties, young people commonly indulge in the world of drugs recreationally. Whilst this might not be a regular thing, the usage of drugs can implement serious long-term problems for those using.  

What drugs are common amongst the nightlife scenes?

According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse: the most common club drugs tend to be consumed by young people, often at bars, parties, concerts, and nightclubs. These drugs include alcohol, ketamine, MDMA (ecstasy) and cocaine. These drugs offer a state of “euphoria” or “trips” that can be seriously damaging to the person taking them. Effects include hallucinations, increased heart rate, high blood pressure and other dangerous side effects.  

Why do people take drugs at parties and clubs?

Often when people take drugs during parties or nights out, it’s because it has become normalised amongst young people to the point where people feel obliged to take them to enjoy their night. Club drugs are easily obtained and can even be sold in plain sight at the club. With such easy access to these drugs, it has a significant increase on the amount of people using. Contributing factors also include peer pressure and drugs sometimes being less expensive than buying drinks in a club.  

What are the long-term effects?

Despite being used less often than in a drug addiction, the fact still stands, harmful substances are still being consumed. They can be just as detrimental to your health as frequent drug use. One of the biggest effects recreational drug use can have is long lasting damage to the brain that affects thoughts and memory. Other damage to the brain includes learning ability, sleeping and emotion levels. Additionally, kidney failure, cardiovascular failure and even haemorrhaging.

It’s important to understand that drugs that are used casually are just as harmful. Furthermore, addiction to these drugs is still possible and people often find that after frequent consumption, they can no longer enjoy a night out as much without taking drugs – sometimes an addiction forming without them realising.

 

If you suspect you or a loved one may be experiencing a difficult time with drugs, get in touch with New Leaf today. We are here to help you. Contact us on 0300 999 0330 or fill out our online contact form today!