Addiction group therapy is a great help for a lot of people recovering from any kind of addiction. Being in a space surrounded by people who have been through similar situation, if not the same, can often be reassuring to a lot of people, especially recovering addicts.

What is group therapy?

Group therapy is a form of therapy in which clients are led by a trained therapist in a course of therapy sessions. During these sessions participants can choose to discuss their addictions, concerns, family problems and anything else that might be on their mind concerning their addiction and recovery. People often find group therapy useful as being able to speak so openly in a space free from judgement can be revolutionary for them. Similarly, being in a room full of people who have been through similar experiences to each other can be an outlet to compare and help each other with ways and techniques for overcoming battles.

Group therapy aims to help individuals to identify their issues, learn through feedback and provide a supportive environment free from judgement.

Benefits of group therapy

There are many benefits of addiction group therapy that helps the journey to recovery. Socialising and speaking in a group setting can be beneficial for the extra human contact.

One of the greatest things provided from group therapy is the shared identification we can find with others; it helps to reduce feeling of being alone or isolated in addiction. It is also a valuable opportunity to witness the recovery of others. Seeing someone else transform their life can be enlightening and motivating.

Another great factor that group therapy offers is the opportunity to learn from those around you. Learning about someone’s journey and how they overcome battles can not only be motivating, but it can also teach you how you can do the same. When one person discusses a situation, it can become a lesson to everyone else in the group. Similarly, it can also be a good feeling to think that: by being open about your addiction, you might help someone else in the group that is particularly struggling.