In this article, we discuss what is known as a ‘problem drinker’, helping individuals to identify if there drinking habits have become unhealthy and an effective way of overcoming this problem and re-gain control.

Problem Drinking

What are problem drinkers?

There is a difference between problem drinkers and alcoholics. Problem drinkers are often described as those who are psychologically addicted to alcohol and as a result of this, drink to relieve stress and anxiety. For example, an individual who drinks after work to deal with work-related stress or a parent that drinks after the children go to sleep, is identified as a problem drinker. Whereas an alcoholic is known as someone who is physically dependant on alcohol.

How to overcome problem drinking

During lockdown, studies show that there has been an increase in problem drinkers. Before your ‘harmless’ drinking leads to an addiction, we have provided you with two ways to overcome your problem drinking. These include:

  • Quitting altogether. Many individuals find it a lot easier to completely cut alcohol out of their lives rather than cutting down after they realise their relationship with alcohol.
  • Cutting down. If you do not wish to completely stop drinking alcohol, at this point in time, there is an option to cut down how much you consume. Do some research into the number of units you should be drinking, try and cut down the days you are consuming alcohol or limit yourself to the type of alcohol you drink.

There are many options available to you as a problem drinker before your use leads to an addiction. However, if you feel as though you are addicted to alcohol and that you cannot live without it, there are many places you can reach out to. New Leaf Recovery is a rehabilitation centre based in Birmingham offering residential recovery programmes to those suffering with addictions, including alcohol addictions.

It is not too late! Get help today by contacting us here at New Leaf by telephone on 0300 999 0330 or by filling out our online contact form.